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What causes osteomalacia?

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It happens when your bones don't get enough minerals. There are a few main reasons it can happen:

You’re not getting enough vitamin D, which you need to absorb calcium from your diet.

Your body has a hard time absorbing vitamin D. That could happen because of gastric bypass or other surgeries that remove part of your stomach or intestines, celiac disease, and certain liver or kidney disorders.

Some seizure medications can cause it.

It’s rare, but some people have a genetic condition that causes osteomalacia.

From: What is Osteomalacia? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: “Scientists Gain New Clues to Bone Mineralization.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Osteomalacia.”

Cedars Sinai Medical Center: “Osteomalacia.”

National Organization for Rare Disorders: “Rickets, Vitamin D Deficiency.”

Mayo Clinic: “Osteomalacia.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Osteoporosis and Osteomalacia.”

National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements: “Vitamin D.”

 

Reviewed by David Zelman on May 05, 2018

SOURCES:

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: “Scientists Gain New Clues to Bone Mineralization.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Osteomalacia.”

Cedars Sinai Medical Center: “Osteomalacia.”

National Organization for Rare Disorders: “Rickets, Vitamin D Deficiency.”

Mayo Clinic: “Osteomalacia.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Osteoporosis and Osteomalacia.”

National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements: “Vitamin D.”

 

Reviewed by David Zelman on May 05, 2018

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What are symptoms of osteomalacia?

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