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What is juvenile osteoporosis?

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Osteoporosis is a condition that weakens your bones, making fractures more likely. It’s most common later in life, especially in women after menopause.

But it’s possible for children and teens to develop juvenile osteoporosis. It happens most often in children ages 8 to 14. It sometimes develops in younger children during growth spurts.

It’s a serious problem, because it strikes when a child is still building up his bone strength. It can raise the odds they'll have complications such as fractures.

SOURCES:

Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford: "Juvenile Osteoporosis."

Catherine Gordon, MD, director, Bone Health Program, Children's Hospital, Boston, MA.

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "Juvenile Osteoporosis" and "Osteoporosis: Peak Bone Mass in Women."

National Osteoporosis Foundation: "Juvenile Osteoporosis Clinical Trial, Medical University of South Carolina."

Reviewed by Roy Benaroch on May 02, 2018

SOURCES:

Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford: "Juvenile Osteoporosis."

Catherine Gordon, MD, director, Bone Health Program, Children's Hospital, Boston, MA.

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "Juvenile Osteoporosis" and "Osteoporosis: Peak Bone Mass in Women."

National Osteoporosis Foundation: "Juvenile Osteoporosis Clinical Trial, Medical University of South Carolina."

Reviewed by Roy Benaroch on May 02, 2018

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What are kinds of juvenile osteoporosis?

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