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What is osteomalacia?

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The word osteomalacia means “soft bones.” The condition keeps your bones from mineralizing, or hardening, as they should. That makes them weak and more likely to bend and break.

Only adults have it. When the same thing happens in children, it’s called rickets. Osteomalacia is more common in women and often happens during pregnancy.

It’s not the same as osteoporosis. Both can cause bones to break. But while osteomalacia is a problem with bones not hardening, osteoporosis is the weakening of the bone.

From: What is Osteomalacia? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: “Scientists Gain New Clues to Bone Mineralization.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Osteomalacia.”

Cedars Sinai Medical Center: “Osteomalacia.”

National Organization for Rare Disorders: “Rickets, Vitamin D Deficiency.”

Mayo Clinic: “Osteomalacia.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Osteoporosis and Osteomalacia.”

National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements: “Vitamin D.”

 

Reviewed by David Zelman on May 05, 2018

SOURCES:

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: “Scientists Gain New Clues to Bone Mineralization.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Osteomalacia.”

Cedars Sinai Medical Center: “Osteomalacia.”

National Organization for Rare Disorders: “Rickets, Vitamin D Deficiency.”

Mayo Clinic: “Osteomalacia.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Osteoporosis and Osteomalacia.”

National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements: “Vitamin D.”

 

Reviewed by David Zelman on May 05, 2018

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What causes osteomalacia?

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