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What is osteopenia?

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Think of it as a midpoint between having healthy bones and having osteoporosis. Osteopenia is when your bones are weaker than normal but not so far gone that they break easily. It happens when your body gets rid of more bone than it is creating.

Osteopenia isn't inevitable. If it happens at all, you usually get osteopenia after age 50. Diet, exercise, and sometimes medication can help keep your bones dense and strong for decades.

From: What Is Osteopenia? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Osteoporosis Foundation: "Osteopenia."

Radiological Society of North America & American College of Radiology: "Osteopenia."

University of Michigan Health System: "Osteopenia."

Harvard Medical School: "Osteopenia: When you have weak bones, but not osteoporosis."

Hospital for Special Surgery: "Osteopenia."

American Academy of Family Physicians: "Osteopenia."

Reviews in Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders : “Diagnosis and treatment of osteopenia.”

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "What People With Celiac Disease Need to Know About Osteoporosis," "Bone Mass Measurement: What the Numbers Mean.

National Institute on Aging: "Osteoporosis: The Bone Thief."

Lu, Z. et al. The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, March 2007.

Reviewed by David Zelman on May 28, 2019

SOURCES:

National Osteoporosis Foundation: "Osteopenia."

Radiological Society of North America & American College of Radiology: "Osteopenia."

University of Michigan Health System: "Osteopenia."

Harvard Medical School: "Osteopenia: When you have weak bones, but not osteoporosis."

Hospital for Special Surgery: "Osteopenia."

American Academy of Family Physicians: "Osteopenia."

Reviews in Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders : “Diagnosis and treatment of osteopenia.”

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "What People With Celiac Disease Need to Know About Osteoporosis," "Bone Mass Measurement: What the Numbers Mean.

National Institute on Aging: "Osteoporosis: The Bone Thief."

Lu, Z. et al. The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, March 2007.

Reviewed by David Zelman on May 28, 2019

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Who gets osteopenia?

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