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What is osteoporosis and how is it related to an ankle fracture?

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With osteoporosis, you're at extra risk for breaking a bone, or "fracturing" it. With a fall or even a simple misstep, you could break your ankle. Doctors say they’re seeing more broken ankles, and they’re more severe as adults stay active later in life.

If you injure your ankle, it may swell up, hurt, and bruise. You'll find it hard to walk. But you probably won’t be off your feet for too long. There are treatments, including surgery, that will get you moving again.

From: Osteoporosis and Ankle Fracture Repair WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: "Ankle Fractures (Broken Ankle)."

American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons: "Ankle Fractures Often Not Diagnosed."

American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society: "Ankle Fracture Surgery."

University of Michigan Health System: "Ankle Fracture."

European Federation of National Associations of Orthopaedics and Traumatology: “Management of Ankle Fractures in the Elderly.”

Reviewed by William Blahd on December 03, 2016

SOURCES:

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: "Ankle Fractures (Broken Ankle)."

American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons: "Ankle Fractures Often Not Diagnosed."

American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society: "Ankle Fracture Surgery."

University of Michigan Health System: "Ankle Fracture."

European Federation of National Associations of Orthopaedics and Traumatology: “Management of Ankle Fractures in the Elderly.”

Reviewed by William Blahd on December 03, 2016

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How is an ankle fracture diagnosed?

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