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What is the link between menopause and osteoporosis?

ANSWER

The drop in estrogen levels during menopause can lead to great thinning of bone and up your chances of osteoporosis. But menopause isn’t the only cause for the bone disease. Many other factors -- like your genes, some diseases and treatments, eating disorders, too much exercise and weight loss, smoking, too much alcohol, and lack of calcium and vitamin D -- can play an important role. Men can get osteoporosis, too.

SOURCES:

Shreyasee Amin, MD, rheumatologist, assistant professor of medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.

Black, D. , May 3, 2007. NEJM

John Schousboe, MD, director, Park Nicollet Clinic Osteoporosis Center, St. Louis Park, Minn.; consultant rheumatologist, American College of Rheumatology.

Mulder, J. , 2006. Nat Clin Pract Endocrinol Metab

National Osteoporosis Foundation: "Physician's Guide to Prevention and Treatment of Osteoporosis," "BMD Testing: What the Numbers Mean," "Osteoporosis in Men."

New York State Osteoporosis Prevention and Education Program: "Heredity."

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the National Institutes of Health: "Osteoporosis."

WebMD Medical Reference: "Juvenile Osteoporosis."

WebMD Feature: "Exercise for Osteoporosis."

University of Arizona, College of Agriculture: "High Calcium Foods."

Reviewed by David Zelman on May 05, 2018

SOURCES:

Shreyasee Amin, MD, rheumatologist, assistant professor of medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.

Black, D. , May 3, 2007. NEJM

John Schousboe, MD, director, Park Nicollet Clinic Osteoporosis Center, St. Louis Park, Minn.; consultant rheumatologist, American College of Rheumatology.

Mulder, J. , 2006. Nat Clin Pract Endocrinol Metab

National Osteoporosis Foundation: "Physician's Guide to Prevention and Treatment of Osteoporosis," "BMD Testing: What the Numbers Mean," "Osteoporosis in Men."

New York State Osteoporosis Prevention and Education Program: "Heredity."

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the National Institutes of Health: "Osteoporosis."

WebMD Medical Reference: "Juvenile Osteoporosis."

WebMD Feature: "Exercise for Osteoporosis."

University of Arizona, College of Agriculture: "High Calcium Foods."

Reviewed by David Zelman on May 05, 2018

NEXT QUESTION:

How does a bone density test help in preventing osteoporosis?

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