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What lifestyle habits help osteopenia?

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If you have strong bones, a healthy lifestyle can help keep them that way. If you already have osteopenia, those same lifestyle choices can lower the chances you’ll get osteoporosis. Make these practices part of your routine:

  • Do weight-bearing exercises that force your body to work against gravity.
  • Eat a diet rich in calcium and vitamin D.
  • Cut back on salt and caffeine.
  • Don’t smoke, or try to quit.
  • Drink alcohol in moderation -- no more than one drink a day for women, two for men.

From: Osteopenia Treatment WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

University of Michigan Health Center: "Osteoporosis in Women" and "Osteoporosis."

Columbia Medical Center: "To Treat or Not to Treat?"

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "Conditions and Behaviors That Increase Osteoporosis Risk."

MedlinePlus: "Osteoporosis."

National Osteoporosis Foundation web site.

National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements: "Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet: Vitamin D."

MedlinePlus: "Calcitonin Salmon Nasal Spray."

American College of Rheumatology: "Teriparatide (Forteo) for the Treatment of Osteoporosis."

University of Maryland Medical Center: "Omega-3 fatty acids."

NIH Office of Dietary Supplements: “Vitamin D.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Soda, Tea and Coffee: Which Can Lower Your Bone Density?”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on September 26, 2016

SOURCES:

University of Michigan Health Center: "Osteoporosis in Women" and "Osteoporosis."

Columbia Medical Center: "To Treat or Not to Treat?"

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "Conditions and Behaviors That Increase Osteoporosis Risk."

MedlinePlus: "Osteoporosis."

National Osteoporosis Foundation web site.

National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements: "Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet: Vitamin D."

MedlinePlus: "Calcitonin Salmon Nasal Spray."

American College of Rheumatology: "Teriparatide (Forteo) for the Treatment of Osteoporosis."

University of Maryland Medical Center: "Omega-3 fatty acids."

NIH Office of Dietary Supplements: “Vitamin D.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Soda, Tea and Coffee: Which Can Lower Your Bone Density?”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on September 26, 2016

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What kind of exercise is good for osteopenia?

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