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What medications can help osteoporosis?

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Your doctor may prescribe medications to treat osteoporosis, too.

Some of these slow down bone loss. Your doctor may call these meds bisphosphonates. They include:

Another osteoporosis med, raloxifene (Evista) works like estrogen in keeping up your bone mass.

The medications abaloparatide (Tymlos)  or teriparatide (Forteo) treat osteoporosis in postmenopausal women and men who are at high risk for a fracture. They're a man-made form of parathyroid hormone.  

 Romosozumab-aqqg (Evenity) is a new medication that is als used to treat osteoporosis in postmenopausal women who are at high risk for a fracture. It is an antsclerostin antibody and works mainly by increasing new bone formation. 

There’s also a biologic drug -- denosumab (Prolia, Xgeva) -- for osteoporosis. It turns off the process that makes the body break down bones.

  • Alendronate (Bonosto, Fosamax)
  • Ibandronate (Boniva)
  • Risedronate (Actonel, Atelvia)
  • Zoledronic acid (Reclast, Zometa)

SOURCES:

National Institutes of Health, Office of Dietary Supplements: "Calcium,” “Vitamin D.”

Mayo Clinic: "Osteoporosis: Self-management: Lifestyle and Home Remedies.”

UpToDate: “Patient Education: Osteoporosis prevention and treatment (Beyond the Basics).”

Reviewed by David Zelman on May 28, 2019

SOURCES:

National Institutes of Health, Office of Dietary Supplements: "Calcium,” “Vitamin D.”

Mayo Clinic: "Osteoporosis: Self-management: Lifestyle and Home Remedies.”

UpToDate: “Patient Education: Osteoporosis prevention and treatment (Beyond the Basics).”

Reviewed by David Zelman on May 28, 2019

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How can hormone replacement therapy help manage osteoporosis?

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