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What would happen if your body has trouble absorbing vitamin D when you have osteomalacia?

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If your body has trouble absorbing vitamin D, your doctor will need to treat the cause, if possible. You’ll also need to take larger doses of calcium and vitamin D than the normal daily recommendation.

To treat broken or deformed bones from osteomalacia, your doctor may give you a brace to wear. If the problem is severe, you may need surgery.

From: What is Osteomalacia? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: “Scientists Gain New Clues to Bone Mineralization.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Osteomalacia.”

Cedars Sinai Medical Center: “Osteomalacia.”

National Organization for Rare Disorders: “Rickets, Vitamin D Deficiency.”

Mayo Clinic: “Osteomalacia.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Osteoporosis and Osteomalacia.”

National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements: “Vitamin D.”

 

Reviewed by David Zelman on May 05, 2018

SOURCES:

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: “Scientists Gain New Clues to Bone Mineralization.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Osteomalacia.”

Cedars Sinai Medical Center: “Osteomalacia.”

National Organization for Rare Disorders: “Rickets, Vitamin D Deficiency.”

Mayo Clinic: “Osteomalacia.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Osteoporosis and Osteomalacia.”

National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements: “Vitamin D.”

 

Reviewed by David Zelman on May 05, 2018

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