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What is the link between menopause and ovarian cancer?

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Menopause doesn't cause ovarian cancer. But you’re more likely to get it simply as you get older. Ovarian cancer can happen at any age, but it’s most common in women over 50. Women 62 and older make up half of all ovarian cancer cases.

There are a few things related to menopause that may affect your risk of developing ovarian cancer.

If you start menopause late -- usually after age 52 -- your chances may be higher. That could be because you've had more ovulations. Those are the times when your menstrual cycle triggers your hormones to release an egg.

SOURCES:

HealthyWomen.org: "Ovarian Cancer."

Mayo Clinic: "Ovarian Cancer: Risk Factors," "Ovarian Cancer: Definition," "Ovarian Cancer: Symptoms."

American Cancer Society: "What Are the Risk Factors for Ovarian Cancer?"

MD Anderson Cancer Center: "10 Cancer symptoms women shouldn't ignore,"  "How does menopause affect cancer risk?"

National Cancer Institute: "Menopausal Hormone Therapy and Cancer."

American Society of Clinical Oncology: "Menopause and Cancer Risk."

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on May 3, 2019

SOURCES:

HealthyWomen.org: "Ovarian Cancer."

Mayo Clinic: "Ovarian Cancer: Risk Factors," "Ovarian Cancer: Definition," "Ovarian Cancer: Symptoms."

American Cancer Society: "What Are the Risk Factors for Ovarian Cancer?"

MD Anderson Cancer Center: "10 Cancer symptoms women shouldn't ignore,"  "How does menopause affect cancer risk?"

National Cancer Institute: "Menopausal Hormone Therapy and Cancer."

American Society of Clinical Oncology: "Menopause and Cancer Risk."

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on May 3, 2019

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What's the link between hormone therapy and ovarian cancer?

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