PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What are my options for carpal tunnel surgery?

ANSWER

There are two main types of carpal tunnel release surgery: open and endoscopic. In both cases, your doctor cuts the ligament around the carpal tunnel to take pressure off the median nerve and relieve your symptoms. After the surgery, the ligament comes back together, but with more room for the median nerve to pass through.

  • Open surgery involves a larger cut, or incision -- up to 2 inches from your wrist to your palm.
  • In endoscopic surgery, your surgeon makes one opening in your wrist, and maybe one in your arm. These cuts are smaller, about a half-inch each. A tiny camera is then put in one of the openings to guide the doctor as they cut the ligament.

From: Do I Need Carpal Tunnel Surgery? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, OrthInfo: “Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.”

Mayo Clinic: “Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.”

NIH, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Strokes: “Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Fact Sheet.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Carpal Tunnel Release.”

University of Washington Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine: “Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.”

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on March 14, 2019

SOURCES:

American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, OrthInfo: “Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.”

Mayo Clinic: “Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.”

NIH, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Strokes: “Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Fact Sheet.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Carpal Tunnel Release.”

University of Washington Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine: “Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.”

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on March 14, 2019

NEXT QUESTION:

What are the risks of carpal tunnel surgery?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

    Other Answers On: