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How can my therapist help me with my knee recovery exercises?

ANSWER

Tell your therapist if something hurts. You might have a little discomfort, but stop if you feel a lot of pain.

You could feel stiff or sore after your therapy, so plan ahead for some time to rest. Ask your doctor or therapist how to get relief from this achiness.

Your physical therapist may also use electricity to help improve your leg muscle strength and knee movement. It's a method called "TENS," short for transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation.

SOURCES:

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: "Knee Conditioning Program."

Jefferson University Hospital: "Physical Therapy."

American Physical Therapy Association: "Physical Therapist's Guide to Knee Pain," "Preparing for Your Visit."

University of California, San Diego: "Physical and Occupational Therapy."

Baylor, Scott & White Health: "Modalities and Assistive Devices Used in Physical Therapy."

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: "Knee Exercises."

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on May 16, 2018

SOURCES:

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: "Knee Conditioning Program."

Jefferson University Hospital: "Physical Therapy."

American Physical Therapy Association: "Physical Therapist's Guide to Knee Pain," "Preparing for Your Visit."

University of California, San Diego: "Physical and Occupational Therapy."

Baylor, Scott & White Health: "Modalities and Assistive Devices Used in Physical Therapy."

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: "Knee Exercises."

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on May 16, 2018

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