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How is a patellofemoral syndrome and chondromalacia patella described and treated?

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In patellofemoral syndrome, the patella rubs against the inner or outer femur rather than tracking straight down the middle. As a result, the patellofemoral joint on either the inner or outer side may become inflamed, causing pain that is worse with activity or prolonged sitting. As the condition progresses, softening and roughening of the articular cartilage on the underside of the patella occurs, leading to chondromalacia patella. Home care with PRICE (protection, rest, ice, compression, and elevation) therapy, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and exercises (such as straight leg raises) that balance the muscles around the patella work for most people. Physical therapy to assess factors that may contribute to the disease process guides treatment to include exercise, bracing or taping of the patella, commercial arch supports (for the arch of the foot), or orthotic supports that correct foot mechanics and may reduce abnormal forces on the knee. Severe cases of patellofemoral syndrome or chondromalacia may be treated surgically through a variety of procedures.

From: Knee Pain Overview WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: 

Bauman A. Runner's World. 2000. Hart L. "Knee Pain." Woman's Day. 2001. Lally S. "End Knee Pain Forever." Men's Health. 1990. Levy AM, Fuerst ML. . New York: John Wiley & Sons; 1993. Roberts DM, Stallard TC.   . Feb 2000. Tintinalli JE, Kellen GD, Staphczynksi JS. . McGraw-Hill; 2000.




Sports Injury Handbook: Professional Advice for Amateur AthletesEmerg Med Clin North AmEmergency Medicine: A Comprehensive Study Guide

Reviewed by Ross Brakeville on January 21, 2017

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SOURCES: 

Bauman A. Runner's World. 2000. Hart L. "Knee Pain." Woman's Day. 2001. Lally S. "End Knee Pain Forever." Men's Health. 1990. Levy AM, Fuerst ML. . New York: John Wiley & Sons; 1993. Roberts DM, Stallard TC.   . Feb 2000. Tintinalli JE, Kellen GD, Staphczynksi JS. . McGraw-Hill; 2000.




Sports Injury Handbook: Professional Advice for Amateur AthletesEmerg Med Clin North AmEmergency Medicine: A Comprehensive Study Guide

Reviewed by Ross Brakeville on January 21, 2017

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