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What happens when you get a knee MRI?

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A typical MRI machine looks like large, hollow tube. Wearing a hospital gown or loose-fitting clothes, you’ll lie on an exam table that slides into the tube. For a knee MRI, you’ll go in feet first, and only your lower body will be in the tube. You'll hold still for around 15 to 45 minutes, sometimes longer, while the machine makes images of your knee.

You may get a special dye injected into your arm before the exam. It helps make the images of your knee clearer. During the exam, you’re usually alone in the room. An MRI technologist will see you the whole time and will talk to you via a two-way intercom.

From: What to Expect During a Knee MRI WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Radiological Society of North America: “Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) – Knee,” “Contrast Materials.”

Cedars-Sinai: “Knee MRI.”

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on May 27, 2019

SOURCES:

Radiological Society of North America: “Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) – Knee,” “Contrast Materials.”

Cedars-Sinai: “Knee MRI.”

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on May 27, 2019

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What can you expect during a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)?

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