PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

When can patellofemoral pain syndrome happen?

ANSWER

Patellofemoral pain syndrome can happen because of strain on your knees, like climbing too many steps. The pain might start because you’ve suddenly started to exercise more, such as going from working out 3 days a week to 6. Or maybe you’ve made your workouts more intense.

From: What Can Go Wrong With My Kneecap? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Kidshealth.org from Nemours Foundation: “Jumper’s Knee.”

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: “Common Knee Injuries,” “Patellar Dislocation and Instability in Children,” “Patellar Fractures,” “Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome.”

U.K. National Health Service: "Dislocated Kneecap."

Johns Hopkins Health Library: "Patellar Instability."

Massachusetts General Hospital: "Patellofemoral Instability."

Shepard Center Spine and Pain Institute: “Patellar Tracking Disorder.”

Texas Health Physicians Group: “Patellar Tracking Disorder.”

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on March 08, 2018

SOURCES:

Kidshealth.org from Nemours Foundation: “Jumper’s Knee.”

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: “Common Knee Injuries,” “Patellar Dislocation and Instability in Children,” “Patellar Fractures,” “Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome.”

U.K. National Health Service: "Dislocated Kneecap."

Johns Hopkins Health Library: "Patellar Instability."

Massachusetts General Hospital: "Patellofemoral Instability."

Shepard Center Spine and Pain Institute: “Patellar Tracking Disorder.”

Texas Health Physicians Group: “Patellar Tracking Disorder.”

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on March 08, 2018

NEXT QUESTION:

What is patellar tracking disorder?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.