Limit Exercise Pain

Limit Exercise Pain

When you have chronic pain, you don't want more pain from exercise. It's normal to feel a bit sore, especially after a new or intensified activity. But don't let that stop your exercise. Instead, learn how to minimize pain from exercise.

Conditions: Osteoarthritis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Back Pain, Neck Pain, Fibromyalgia, Nerve Pain, Migraine, Undiagnosed

Symptoms: Symptoms worse in evening, weakness, muscle pain, lower back pain, upper back pain, tenderness, all over pain, ankle pain, buttock pain, ankle pain, neck pain, shoulder pain, fatigue, symptoms worse in morning, pain, morning stiffness, pain with movement, sharp pain, shocking pain, extreme sensitivity, headache, joint pain, electric pain, pins and needles

Triggers:

Treatment:

Categories: Exercise

Duration

14

Ice After Exercise

If your muscles ache after exercise, try applying ice right after your workout for about 20 minutes. This will help reduce pain and inflammation. Heat is also good for soothing painful joints.

Prompt: Ice after exercise.

CTA: Help sore muscles.

Conditions: Osteoarthritis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Back Pain, Neck pain, Migraine, Nerve Pain, Fibromyalgia, Undiagnosed

Symptoms: Symptoms worse in evening, reduced joint movement, stiffness, stiffness after rest, stiff joint, swollen joint, warm joint, joint pain, muscle pain, lower back pain, tenderness, buttock pain, neck pain, shoulder pain, fatigue, symptoms worse in morning, muscle pain, pain, morning stiffness, pain with movement, sharp pain, shocking pain, extreme sensitivity, difficulty sleeping

Triggers: Exercising, heavy lifting, pushing or pulling, repetitive motions, twisting, overdoing it, injury

Treatment: Ice, massage, meditation, muscle relaxation, physical therapy, relaxation therapy, cold compress/cold packs, rest, acetaminophen, Tylenol, Tempra, Panadol, ibuprofen, Advil, Motrin IB, naproxen, Aleve

Categories: Exercise

Tailored Exercise

When you're in pain, you need a recovery plan tailored to fit you. Not everyone needs the same type of exercises -- some people need core strengthening while others benefit from stretching and improving flexibility. A physical therapist or exercise physiologist can create an exercise plan just for you. See a specialist to learn what exercises and stretches will help you feel better.

Prompt: Exercise tailor?

CTA: Get a custom exercise plan.

Conditions: Back Pain, Neck Pain, Nerve Pain, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, Migraine, Undiagnosed, Fibromyalgia

Symptoms: Symptoms worse in evening, reduced joint movement, stiffness, stiffness after rest, stiff joint, swollen joint, joint pain, muscle pain, lower back pain, tenderness, buttock pain, neck pain, shoulder pain, fatigue, symptoms worse in morning, pain, morning stiffness, pain with movement, sharp pain, shocking pain, extreme sensitivity, difficulty sleeping

Triggers: Exercising, heavy lifting, pushing or pulling, repetitive motions, twisting, overdoing it, injury, sitting too long, standing too long

Treatment: Ice, massage, meditation, muscle relaxation, physical therapy, relaxation therapy, cold compress/cold packs, rest

Categories: Exercise

Cross-Train

Cross-training doesn't have to mean long, intense workouts. It just means working different types of activities into your exercise routine, such as combining aerobic exercise with weight training or yoga. The idea is to work a variety of muscles to keep your whole body fit. Cross-training also makes it less likely that you'll injure yourself from muscle overuse while you're exercising.

Prompt: Work muscle groups.

CTA: Cross-train for balance.

Conditions: Osteoarthritis, Rheumatoid arthritis, Back Pain, Neck Pain, fibromyalgia

Symptoms: Symptoms worse in evening, weakness, muscle pain, lower back pain, upper back pain, tenderness, all over pain, ankle pain, buttock pain, ankle pain, neck pain, shoulder pain, fatigue, symptoms worse in morning, pain, morning stiffness, pain with movement, sharp pain, shocking pain, extreme sensitivity, headache

Triggers:

Treatment:

Categories: Exercise

Stay Active

Getting regular exercise helps reduce joint stiffness and pain, builds strong muscles, and increases endurance and flexibility. If pain is keeping you from exercising, start with something that doesn't tax your joints, like using a stationary bike or doing water exercise.

Prompt: Keep moving.

CTA: Break the immobility cycle.

Conditions: Osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, migraine, back pain, neck pain, nerve pain, fibromyalgia, undiagnosed

Symptoms: Morning stiffness, pain with movement, joint pain, Symptoms worse in evening, weakness, muscle pain, lower back pain, upper back pain, tenderness, all over pain, ankle pain, buttock pain, ankle pain, neck pain, shoulder pain, fatigue, symptoms worse in morning, pain, morning stiffness, pain with movement, sharp pain, shocking pain, extreme sensitivity, headache

Triggers: Exercising, pushing or pulling, twisting, overdoing it, injury

Treatment: Exercise, physical therapy, heat, rest, over-the-counter drugs, prescription medications

Categories: Exercise

Love Your Joints

Certain exercises can place stress on your joints. These include high-impact exercises such as running, jogging, high-impact aerobics, and jumping rope. It also includes any activity where you jump, such as basketball. Choose low-impact exercises such as swimming, biking, yoga, or walking.

Prompt: Avoid high impact.

CTA: Choose low-impact exercises.

Conditions: Osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis

Symptoms: Symptoms worse in evening, reduced joint movement, stiffness, stiffness after rest, deformed joint, stiff joint, swollen joint, warm joint, joint pain, knee pain

Triggers:

Treatment:

Categories: Exercise

WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Ross Brakeville, DPT on January 22, 2019

Sources

SOURCES:

Arthritis Foundation: "Introduction to Exercise," "Osteoarthritis: What Is It?"

American Academy of Family Physicians FamilyDoctor.org web site: "Low Back Pain: Tips on Pain Relief and Prevention."

American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons web site: "Low Back Pain."

Rouzier, P. The Sports Medicine Patient Advisor, second edition, SportsMed Press, 2004.

University of Missouri-Columbia: "Mechanical Low Back Pain."

NYU Langone Medical Center: "Practical Prevention: Osteoarthritis."

University of Michigan Health System: "Osteoarthritis."

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "Handout on Health: Sports Injuries."

The American Council on Exercise: "Injury May Increase Risk of Osteoarthritis."

Hakkinen, A. Current Opinion in Rheumatology, March 2004.

Munneke, M. Arthritis and Rheumatism, June 15, 2005.

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