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How are spinal headaches treated?

ANSWER

The first course of treatment for spinal headaches involves supplying adequate hydration to try to increase cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) pressure. Sometimes intravenous fluids (fluids administered into the veins) are given; other times the person is advised to drink a beverage high in caffeine. Strict bed rest for 24-48 hours may be recommended.

In a few cases, gabapentin, hydrocortisone, or theophylline may be prescribed if conservative treatments don't work.

In addition, if a person develops a spinal headache following a procedure, the anesthesiologist can create a blood patch with the person's blood to seal the leak. To administer a blood patch, the anesthesiologist inserts a needle into the same space as, or right next to, the area in which the anesthetic was injected. The doctor then takes a small amount of blood from the patient and injects it into the epidural space. The blood clots and seals the hole that caused the leak.

From: Spinal Headaches WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: 

Mayo Clinic.

Thoennissen, J. , Nov. 13, 2001. CMAJ

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on August 27, 2018

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

SOURCES: 

Mayo Clinic.

Thoennissen, J. , Nov. 13, 2001. CMAJ

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on August 27, 2018

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