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How can TENS help with treating pain after surgery?

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To help treat post-surgery pain, TENS is most effective in treating mild to moderate pain after several types of operations, including heart surgery, chest surgery, hysterectomy and other gynecological surgeries, orthopedic surgery, and abdominal surgery.

From: Can TENS Help Your Pain? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Josimari M. December 2008. Current Rheumatology Reports,

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: “Alternative Methods to Help Manage Pain After Orthopaedic Surgery.”

Medscape: "Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation."

Cipriano, G. April 16, 2008. Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery,

Emmiler, M. 2008. The Heart Surgery Forum,

Benedetti, F. March 1997. Annals of Thoracic Surgery,

Chen, L. November 1998. Anesthesia and Analgesia,

Hamza, M. November 1999. Anesthesiology,

Rakel, B. October 2003. Journal of Pain,

Law, P. September 2004. Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine,

Cetin, N. June 2008. American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation,

Brousseau, L. April 2003. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews,

Dubinsky, R. January 2010. Neurology,

Moreno-Duarte, I. January 2014. Neuroimage,

Singla, S. July-December 2011. Journal of Neurosciences in Rural Practice,

Tugay, N. June 2007. Pain Medicine,

Kaplan, B. March 1998. International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics,

Dailey, D. November 2013. Pain,

Dubinsky, R. January 2010. Neurology,

American Academy of Neurology: “Guideline: Widely Used Device for Pain Therapy Not Recommended for Chronic Low-Back Pain.”

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. “Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) for chronic low back pain (CLBP).”

Sluka, K. May 2013. Journal of the American Physical Therapy Association,

Jones, I. 2009. Continuing Education in Anaesthesia, Critical Care & Pain,

Nursing Times: “Exploring the Evidence for Using TENS to Relieve Pain.”

NHS: "TENS (Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation).”

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on October 15, 2017

SOURCES:

Josimari M. December 2008. Current Rheumatology Reports,

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: “Alternative Methods to Help Manage Pain After Orthopaedic Surgery.”

Medscape: "Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation."

Cipriano, G. April 16, 2008. Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery,

Emmiler, M. 2008. The Heart Surgery Forum,

Benedetti, F. March 1997. Annals of Thoracic Surgery,

Chen, L. November 1998. Anesthesia and Analgesia,

Hamza, M. November 1999. Anesthesiology,

Rakel, B. October 2003. Journal of Pain,

Law, P. September 2004. Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine,

Cetin, N. June 2008. American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation,

Brousseau, L. April 2003. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews,

Dubinsky, R. January 2010. Neurology,

Moreno-Duarte, I. January 2014. Neuroimage,

Singla, S. July-December 2011. Journal of Neurosciences in Rural Practice,

Tugay, N. June 2007. Pain Medicine,

Kaplan, B. March 1998. International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics,

Dailey, D. November 2013. Pain,

Dubinsky, R. January 2010. Neurology,

American Academy of Neurology: “Guideline: Widely Used Device for Pain Therapy Not Recommended for Chronic Low-Back Pain.”

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. “Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) for chronic low back pain (CLBP).”

Sluka, K. May 2013. Journal of the American Physical Therapy Association,

Jones, I. 2009. Continuing Education in Anaesthesia, Critical Care & Pain,

Nursing Times: “Exploring the Evidence for Using TENS to Relieve Pain.”

NHS: "TENS (Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation).”

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on October 15, 2017

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How can TENS help with treating arthritis pain?

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