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How does Reiki work?

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Many types of natural medicine are based on the belief that every person has a "biofield." That's an energy field just outside your body. When something messes with it, you get sick or don't feel well.

Reiki, acupuncture, tai chi, and yoga are all centered around the idea of a biofield. They work to restore its balance through pressure, movement, or breathing.

Some experts think that when a Reiki practitioner puts her hands on or above your body it can help make a weak biofield stronger. Others believe it makes you feel better by shifting your body from a tense "fight or flight" mode to a more relaxed state.

From: What Is Reiki? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

University of Minnesota: "Where Does Reiki Come From?" "How Does Reiki Work?" "How Can Reiki Help Me?" "How Can I Find a Qualified Reiki Practitioner?" "What Can I Expect in a Typical Reiki Session?"

Alternative Therapies : "Reiki -- Review of a Biofield Therapy: History, Theory, Practice and Research."

Mayo Clinic/Dan Abraham Healthy Living Center: "9 Facts About Reiki."

Cancer Prevention & Control : "Using Reiki to manage pain: a preliminary report."

The American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Care : "The effects of Reiki therapy on pain and anxiety in patients attending a day oncology and infusion services unit."

International Association of Reiki Professionals: "Reiki for Depression."

Johns Hopkins Medicine/Integrated Medicine and Digestive Center: "Reiki."

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health: "Reiki: In Depth."

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on May 27, 2019

SOURCES:

University of Minnesota: "Where Does Reiki Come From?" "How Does Reiki Work?" "How Can Reiki Help Me?" "How Can I Find a Qualified Reiki Practitioner?" "What Can I Expect in a Typical Reiki Session?"

Alternative Therapies : "Reiki -- Review of a Biofield Therapy: History, Theory, Practice and Research."

Mayo Clinic/Dan Abraham Healthy Living Center: "9 Facts About Reiki."

Cancer Prevention & Control : "Using Reiki to manage pain: a preliminary report."

The American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Care : "The effects of Reiki therapy on pain and anxiety in patients attending a day oncology and infusion services unit."

International Association of Reiki Professionals: "Reiki for Depression."

Johns Hopkins Medicine/Integrated Medicine and Digestive Center: "Reiki."

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health: "Reiki: In Depth."

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on May 27, 2019

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How do I find someone trained in Reiki?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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