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How is piriformis syndrome treated?

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If pain is caused by sitting or certain activities, try to avoid positions that trigger that pain. Rest, ice, and heat may help relieve symptoms. A doctor or physical therapist can suggest a program of exercises and stretches to help reduce sciatic nerve compression. Osteopathic manipulative treatment has been used to help relieve pain and increase range of motion. Some healthcare providers may recommend anti-inflammatory medications, muscle relaxants, or injections with a corticosteroid or anesthetic. Other therapies such as iontophoresis, which uses a mild electric current, and injection with botulinum toxin (botox) have been tried by some doctors. Using the paralytic properties of the botulinum toxin, botox injections are thought by some to relieve muscle tightness and sciatic nerve compression to minimize pain.

Surgery may be recommended as a last resort.

From: Piriformis Syndrome WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: “NINDS Piriformis Syndrome Information Page.”

Marieb, E. Benjamin/Cummings Science Publishing, 1998. Human Anatomy and Physiology, Fourth Edition,

Merck Manuals: “Piriformis Syndrome.”

Boyajian-O’Neill, L., McClain, R., Coleman, M., Thomas, P. November 2008. The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association,

PhysioAdvisor.com: “Piriformis Syndrome.”

Electrotherapy on the Web, An Educational Resource.

Sports Medicine: “Piriformis Syndrome: The Big Mystery or a Pain in the Behind.”

Kirschner, J. July 2009. Muscle and Nerve,

 

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on November 13, 2019

SOURCES:

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: “NINDS Piriformis Syndrome Information Page.”

Marieb, E. Benjamin/Cummings Science Publishing, 1998. Human Anatomy and Physiology, Fourth Edition,

Merck Manuals: “Piriformis Syndrome.”

Boyajian-O’Neill, L., McClain, R., Coleman, M., Thomas, P. November 2008. The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association,

PhysioAdvisor.com: “Piriformis Syndrome.”

Electrotherapy on the Web, An Educational Resource.

Sports Medicine: “Piriformis Syndrome: The Big Mystery or a Pain in the Behind.”

Kirschner, J. July 2009. Muscle and Nerve,

 

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on November 13, 2019

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