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How is pudendal neuralgia diagnosed?

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If you have pelvic pain, tell your doctor. At your appointment, you’ll answer questions about your symptoms and get a physical examination. Your doctor will put a finger into your vagina or rectum and put pressure on the nerve to check on it.

You might also get an imaging test with an MRI machine. It uses powerful magnets and radio waves to take a picture of your body’s internal organs.

Your doctor may also give you a pudendal nerve block. This is a shot you get in your pelvis to numb the nerve and see if your symptoms go away.

From: What Is Pudendal Neuralgia? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Institutes of Health, Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center: “Pudendal Neuralgia.”

Health Organization for Pudendal Education: “Anatomy of the pudendal nerve.”

Obstetrical and Gynecological Survey: “Diagnostic criteria for pudendal neuralgia by pudendal nerve entrapment (Nantes criteria).”

U.K. National Health Service: “Pudendal neuralgia.”

University of Rochester Medical Center: “Pudendal neuralgia,” “Pudendal nerve block.”

Women’s Health Research Institute of Australia: “Pudendal Neuralgia.”

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on January 23, 2018

SOURCES:

National Institutes of Health, Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center: “Pudendal Neuralgia.”

Health Organization for Pudendal Education: “Anatomy of the pudendal nerve.”

Obstetrical and Gynecological Survey: “Diagnostic criteria for pudendal neuralgia by pudendal nerve entrapment (Nantes criteria).”

U.K. National Health Service: “Pudendal neuralgia.”

University of Rochester Medical Center: “Pudendal neuralgia,” “Pudendal nerve block.”

Women’s Health Research Institute of Australia: “Pudendal Neuralgia.”

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on January 23, 2018

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How is pudendal neuralgia treated?

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