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How is shoulder injury treated?

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For dislocations, separations and fractures, you need a doctor’s help to get your shoulder back in the right position and then a sling to hold it in place while it heals.

For many other issues, your doctor may suggest rest, heat or ice and a medicine like ibuprofen or aspirin to reduce the pain and swelling.

If your shoulder doesn’t improve after these first steps, your doctor may try injecting a corticosteroid (an anti-inflammatory medicine) straight into the joint to relieve swelling and pain.

Sometimes shoulder joint tears, rotator cuff tears and frozen shoulder don’t improve with rest and medicine. Your doctor may recommend surgery.

With any problem in your shoulder, your treatment plan will probably include exercises to help you stretch and strengthen the joint, and to improve your range of motion.

From: Why Does My Shoulder Hurt? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Society for Surgery of the Hand: “Shoulder Pain.”

American Academy of Family Physicians: “Shoulder Pain.”

Mayo Clinic: “Shoulder Pain.”

NIH National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: “Shoulder Problems.”

Arthritis Foundation: “Shoulder Injuries,” “Arthritis and Diseases That Affect the Shoulders.”

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: “Common Shoulder Injuries,” “Dislocated Shoulder,” “Clavicle Fracture,” “Shoulder Joint Tear,” “Rotator Cuff Tears,” “Shoulder Impingement/Rotator Cuff Tendinitis.”

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on May 17, 2019

SOURCES:

American Society for Surgery of the Hand: “Shoulder Pain.”

American Academy of Family Physicians: “Shoulder Pain.”

Mayo Clinic: “Shoulder Pain.”

NIH National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: “Shoulder Problems.”

Arthritis Foundation: “Shoulder Injuries,” “Arthritis and Diseases That Affect the Shoulders.”

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: “Common Shoulder Injuries,” “Dislocated Shoulder,” “Clavicle Fracture,” “Shoulder Joint Tear,” “Rotator Cuff Tears,” “Shoulder Impingement/Rotator Cuff Tendinitis.”

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on May 17, 2019

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