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How long might it take for you to feel better after rotator cuff surgery?

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Most people don’t get instant pain relief from surgery. It may take a few months before your shoulder starts feeling better. Until then, your doctor will advise you to take over-the-counter pain relievers.

Opioid painkillers are also an option, but come with the risk of addiction. If your doctor prescribes them, it’s crucial to take them only as directed. Stop using them as soon as your pain goes away or when your pain can be controlled by other medications like acetaminophen, aspirin, ibuprofen, or naproxen.

SOURCES:

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons/OrthoInfo: “Rotator Cuff Tears: Surgical Treatment Options,” “Rotator Cuff Tears: Frequently Asked Questions.”

Mayo Clinic: “Rotator Cuff Injury.”

UW Medicine Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine: “Arthroscopic shoulder surgery for the treatment of rotator cuff tears.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Rotator Cuff Tears: Surgery and Exercise,” “Arthroscopic Shoulder Decompression.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Rotator Cuff Repair.”

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on February 28, 2017

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

SOURCES:

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons/OrthoInfo: “Rotator Cuff Tears: Surgical Treatment Options,” “Rotator Cuff Tears: Frequently Asked Questions.”

Mayo Clinic: “Rotator Cuff Injury.”

UW Medicine Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine: “Arthroscopic shoulder surgery for the treatment of rotator cuff tears.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Rotator Cuff Tears: Surgery and Exercise,” “Arthroscopic Shoulder Decompression.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Rotator Cuff Repair.”

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on February 28, 2017

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