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What are other treatments for opioid constipation?

ANSWER

You can try options other than medicines to relieve constipation.

Rectal suppositories are laxatives that you put inside your bottom, where they dissolve and your body absorbs their medicine. An enema is a liquid that you flush into your bottom to clean out your colon.

These treatments can help, but doctors don’t often recommend them since they’re uncomfortable. As a last resort, your doctor or nurse may use a gloved finger to get stool out.

The most important thing you can do is to talk with your doctor about your constipation and how you can feel better.

From: Treatments for Opioid Constipation WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Uptodate.com: "Cancer pain management with opioids: Prevention and management of side effects."

Dorn, Spencer et al. , 2014. The American Journal of Gastroenterology Supplement

Supplement to , December 2015. The Journal of Family Practice

University of Wisconsin Health Pain Care Services: "Management of Opioid Induced Constipation."

Palliative Care Network of Wisconsin: "Opioid Induced Constipation Part II: Newer Therapies."

American Chronic Pain Association: "Opioid Induced Constipation."

Medscape. “FDA Okays Naldemedine (Symproic) for Opioid Constipation.”  

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on November 1, 2017

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

SOURCES:

Uptodate.com: "Cancer pain management with opioids: Prevention and management of side effects."

Dorn, Spencer et al. , 2014. The American Journal of Gastroenterology Supplement

Supplement to , December 2015. The Journal of Family Practice

University of Wisconsin Health Pain Care Services: "Management of Opioid Induced Constipation."

Palliative Care Network of Wisconsin: "Opioid Induced Constipation Part II: Newer Therapies."

American Chronic Pain Association: "Opioid Induced Constipation."

Medscape. “FDA Okays Naldemedine (Symproic) for Opioid Constipation.”  

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on November 1, 2017

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.