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What are severe symptoms of complex regional pain syndrome?

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Complex regional pain syndrome usually goes through three stages. As it does the symptoms get more severe:

  • Up to three months: You feel burning pain, and the affected area is more sensitive to touch. Those are the most common early symptoms. Swelling and joint stiffness usually start next.
  • Three months to a year: Swelling is more lasting, and wrinkles in the skin go away. Pain spreads, and joints get stiffer.
  • A year or more: Skin becomes pale, stretched, and shiny. Pain may lessen. Stiffness may mean that the affected limb won't ever move as well as it used to.

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: "Complex Regional Pain Syndrome."

Mayo Clinic: "Complex regional pain syndrome."

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Fact Sheet."

OrthoInfo: "Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy)."

Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome Association: "Telltale Signs and Symptoms of CRPS/RSD,"

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on May 27, 2019

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: "Complex Regional Pain Syndrome."

Mayo Clinic: "Complex regional pain syndrome."

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Fact Sheet."

OrthoInfo: "Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy)."

Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome Association: "Telltale Signs and Symptoms of CRPS/RSD,"

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on May 27, 2019

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How does complex regional pain syndrome progress?

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