PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What are some other ways pain to classify pain?

ANSWER

Pain is most often classified by the kind of damage that causes it. The two main categories are pain caused by tissue damage, also called nociceptive pain, and pain caused by nerve damage, also called neuropathic pain. A third category is psychogenic pain, which is pain that is affected by psychological factors. Psychogenic pain most often has a physical origin either in tissue damage or nerve damage, but the pain caused by that damage is increased or prolonged by such factors as fear, depression, stress, or anxiety. In some cases, pain originates from a psychological condition.

Pain is also classified by the type of tissue that's involved or by the part of the body that's affected. For example, pain may be referred to as muscular pain or joint pain. A doctor could also ask you about chest pain or back pain.

Certain types of pain are referred to as syndromes. For instance, myofascial pain syndrome refers to pain that is set off by trigger points located in the body's muscles. Fibromyalgia is an example.

From: Pain Types and Classifications WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "Pain: Hope Through Research."

Merck: "Pain: Types."

American Chronic Pain Association: "Managing Breakthrough Pain."

Department of Pain Medicine and Palliative Care at Beth Israel Medical Center (StopPain.org): "Myofascial Pain Syndrome."

American Chronic Pain Association: "Understanding Nerve Pain."

National Pain Foundation: "Neuropathic Pain."

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "NINDS Central Pain Syndrome Information Page."

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on August 13, 2017

SOURCES:

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "Pain: Hope Through Research."

Merck: "Pain: Types."

American Chronic Pain Association: "Managing Breakthrough Pain."

Department of Pain Medicine and Palliative Care at Beth Israel Medical Center (StopPain.org): "Myofascial Pain Syndrome."

American Chronic Pain Association: "Understanding Nerve Pain."

National Pain Foundation: "Neuropathic Pain."

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "NINDS Central Pain Syndrome Information Page."

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on August 13, 2017

NEXT QUESTION:

What happens due to pain caused by tissue damage?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

"ALEXA, ASK WEBMD"

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.