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What are symptoms of central pain syndrome?

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Central pain syndrome is characterized by a mixture of pain sensations, the most prominent being a constant burning. The steady burning sensation is sometimes increased by light touch. Pain also increases in the presence of temperature changes, most often cold temperatures. A loss of sensation can occur in affected areas, most prominently on distant parts of the body, such as the hands and feet. There may be brief, intolerable bursts of sharp pain on occasion.

SOURCES: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. UpToDate.

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on April 25, 2019

SOURCES: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. UpToDate.

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on April 25, 2019

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How is central pain syndrome treated?

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