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What are symptoms of trigeminal neuralgia?

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You may notice:

  • Pain that seems to come out of nowhere.
  • Brief periods of stabbing or shooting pain.
  • Pain when you brush your teeth, wash your face, shave, or put on makeup. Even a light breeze might set off your pain.
  • It lasts a few seconds to several minutes.
  • Attacks several times a day or a week, followed by pain free periods.
  • Pain on one side of the face.
  • Attacks happen more often and pain gets worse.
  • The pain mostly affects your cheek, jaw, teeth, gums, and lips. It’s less common in your eyes and forehead.

From: What Is Trigeminal Neuralgia? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: Mayo Clinic: “Diseases and Conditions -- Trigeminal Neuralgia.”

American Association of Neurological Surgeons: “Conditions and Treatments -- Trigeminal Neuralgia.”

TNA Facial Pain Association: “What Is Trigeminal Neuralgia?”

New York Presbyterian Hospital: “Health Library -- Trigeminal Neuralgia.”

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: “Trigeminal Neuralgia Fact Sheet.”

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on March 23, 2018

SOURCES: Mayo Clinic: “Diseases and Conditions -- Trigeminal Neuralgia.”

American Association of Neurological Surgeons: “Conditions and Treatments -- Trigeminal Neuralgia.”

TNA Facial Pain Association: “What Is Trigeminal Neuralgia?”

New York Presbyterian Hospital: “Health Library -- Trigeminal Neuralgia.”

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: “Trigeminal Neuralgia Fact Sheet.”

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on March 23, 2018

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What are the types of trigeminal neuralgia?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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