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What are the symptoms of scleroderma?

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You might notice:

  • Hardened or thickened skin that looks shiny and smooth. It’s most common on the hands and face.
  • Cold fingers or toes that turn red, white, or blue. This is called Raynaud's phenomenon.
  • Ulcers or sores on your fingertips
  • Small red spots on the face and chest. These are opened blood vessels called telangiectasias.
  • Puffy or swollen or painful fingers and/or toes
  • Painful or swollen joints
  • Muscle weakness
  • Dry eyes or mouth (called Sjogren's syndrome)
  • Swelling -- mostly of the hands and fingers. Your doctor may call this edema.
  • Shortness of breath
  • Heartburn
  • Diarrhea
  • Weight Loss

From: Scleroderma WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: 

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. 

Scleroderma: Etiology, Goldman: Cecil Medicine, 24th ed.

Reviewed by William Blahd on July 14, 2017

SOURCES: 

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. 

Scleroderma: Etiology, Goldman: Cecil Medicine, 24th ed.

Reviewed by William Blahd on July 14, 2017

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How is scleroderma diagnosed?

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