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What causes bone spurs?

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Most often, they form after an injury to a joint or tendon. When your body thinks your bone is damaged, it tries to fix it by adding bone to the injured area, creating bone spurs.

Often arthritis causes the damage that makes a bone spur. Osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and gout can, too. Other causes include:

  • Injuries
  • Overuse
  • Genes
  • Diet
  • Obesity
  • Bone problems that you were born with
  • Narrowing of the spine (spinal stenosis)

From: What Are Bone Spurs? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgery: "Plantar Fasciitis and Bone Spurs."

Arthritis Foundation: "51 Ways to Be Good to Your Joints."

Cedars-Sinai: "Bone Spurs (Osteophytes.)"

Harvard Medical School: "Bone spurs."

Institute for Preventive Foot Health: "Prevention and Treatment of Heel Spurs and Bone Spurs."

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Laminectomy."

Lehigh Valley Health Network: "Learn About Bone Spurs."

Mayo Clinic: "Bone spurs: Causes." "Bone Spurs: Definition," "Bone spurs: Symptoms," "Bone spurs: Tests and Diagnosis," "Bone spurs: Treatments and drugs."

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on March 6, 2019

SOURCES:

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgery: "Plantar Fasciitis and Bone Spurs."

Arthritis Foundation: "51 Ways to Be Good to Your Joints."

Cedars-Sinai: "Bone Spurs (Osteophytes.)"

Harvard Medical School: "Bone spurs."

Institute for Preventive Foot Health: "Prevention and Treatment of Heel Spurs and Bone Spurs."

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Laminectomy."

Lehigh Valley Health Network: "Learn About Bone Spurs."

Mayo Clinic: "Bone spurs: Causes." "Bone Spurs: Definition," "Bone spurs: Symptoms," "Bone spurs: Tests and Diagnosis," "Bone spurs: Treatments and drugs."

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on March 6, 2019

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