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What does the treatment for trochanteric bursitis include?

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This common condition happens when the fluid-filled cushioning sacs on the outside point of your hip, called trochanteric bursa, get swollen. It’s easily treated, including with:

  • Ice. Apply ice packs to your hip every four hours for 20 to 30 minutes at a time.
  • Anti-inflammatory medications. Over-the-counter medications such as ibuprofen and naproxen or prescription pain relievers can ease pain and swelling.
  • Rest. If you can stay off your hip, you can give it time to heal.
  • Physical therapy. An expert therapist can give you exercises to improve flexibility and strengthen your muscles.
  • Cortisone shots. This is a powerful anti-inflammatory medication.
  • Low-energy shock wave therapy. Acoustic shock waves are passed through the skin with a targeted device.
  • Surgery. This is done rarely, and only if other treatments haven’t helped.

SOURCES:

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (orthoinfo.aaos.org): “Transient Osteoporosis of the Hip.”

Miller, M., et al. Essential Orthopaedics. Saunders Elsevier, 2010.

Cleveland Clinic: “Trochanteric Bursitis.”

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (orthoinfo.aaos.org): “Hip Bursitis.”

Anesthesia & Analgesia: “Greater trochanteric pain syndrome: a review of anatomy, diagnosis and treatment.”

Houston Methodist: “Trochanteric Bursitis of the Hip.”

Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine: “Efficacy of Treatment of Trochanteric Bursitis: A Systematic Review.”

British Medical Bulletin: “Management of the greater trochanteric pain syndrome: a systematic review,” published online May 28, 2012.

 Journal of Anatomy: “The functional anatomy of the iliotibial band during flexion and extension of the knee: implications for understanding iliotibial band syndrome.”

Mount Sinai Hospital Toronto: “Trochanteric Bursitis” (PDF).

Mayo Clinic: “Bursitis.”

University of California San Francisco Medical Center: “Trochanteric Bursitis.”

University of Rochester Medical Center: “Ice Packs vs. Warm Compresses For Pain.”

National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (www.nice.org.uk): “Interventional procedure overview of extracorporeal shockwave therapy for refractory greater trochanteric pain syndrome.”

Mayo Clinic: “Gout.”

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on May 8, 2019

SOURCES:

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (orthoinfo.aaos.org): “Transient Osteoporosis of the Hip.”

Miller, M., et al. Essential Orthopaedics. Saunders Elsevier, 2010.

Cleveland Clinic: “Trochanteric Bursitis.”

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (orthoinfo.aaos.org): “Hip Bursitis.”

Anesthesia & Analgesia: “Greater trochanteric pain syndrome: a review of anatomy, diagnosis and treatment.”

Houston Methodist: “Trochanteric Bursitis of the Hip.”

Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine: “Efficacy of Treatment of Trochanteric Bursitis: A Systematic Review.”

British Medical Bulletin: “Management of the greater trochanteric pain syndrome: a systematic review,” published online May 28, 2012.

 Journal of Anatomy: “The functional anatomy of the iliotibial band during flexion and extension of the knee: implications for understanding iliotibial band syndrome.”

Mount Sinai Hospital Toronto: “Trochanteric Bursitis” (PDF).

Mayo Clinic: “Bursitis.”

University of California San Francisco Medical Center: “Trochanteric Bursitis.”

University of Rochester Medical Center: “Ice Packs vs. Warm Compresses For Pain.”

National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (www.nice.org.uk): “Interventional procedure overview of extracorporeal shockwave therapy for refractory greater trochanteric pain syndrome.”

Mayo Clinic: “Gout.”

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on May 8, 2019

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