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What is central pain syndrome?

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Central pain syndrome is marked by chronic pain that stems from damage to the central nervous system. The damage can be caused by stroke, multiple sclerosis, tumors, and several other conditions. The pain, which is typically constant and may be severe, can affect a large part of the body or be confined to smaller areas such as the hands or feet. The pain often can be made worse by movement, touch, emotions, and temperature changes.

From: Pain Types and Classifications WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "Pain: Hope Through Research."

Merck: "Pain: Types."

American Chronic Pain Association: "Managing Breakthrough Pain."

Department of Pain Medicine and Palliative Care at Beth Israel Medical Center (StopPain.org): "Myofascial Pain Syndrome."

American Chronic Pain Association: "Understanding Nerve Pain."

National Pain Foundation: "Neuropathic Pain."

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "NINDS Central Pain Syndrome Information Page."

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on August 13, 2017

SOURCES:

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "Pain: Hope Through Research."

Merck: "Pain: Types."

American Chronic Pain Association: "Managing Breakthrough Pain."

Department of Pain Medicine and Palliative Care at Beth Israel Medical Center (StopPain.org): "Myofascial Pain Syndrome."

American Chronic Pain Association: "Understanding Nerve Pain."

National Pain Foundation: "Neuropathic Pain."

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "NINDS Central Pain Syndrome Information Page."

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on August 13, 2017

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What is complex regional pain syndrome?

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