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What is occupational therapy (OT)?

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This type of treatment can help if you have pain, injury, illness, or a disability that makes it hard for you to do your job or schoolwork, care for yourself, complete household chores, move around, or take part in activities. This type of therapy helps you adapt if pain, injury, illness, or disability prevents you from carrying on with your daily activities.

OT can teach you how to use tools, called assistive device. Or with specific things like how to:

You work with an occupational therapist, who are licensed and certified professionals.

Occupational therapy (OT) teaches you how to adapt. It can help you perform any kind of task at school, work, or in your home. You’ll learn how to use tools (you may hear them called assistive devices) if you need them.

  • Eat without help from others
  • Take part in leisure activities
  • Do office work
  • Bathe and get dressed
  • Do laundry or clean up around the house

From: What Is Occupational Therapy? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Occupational Therapy Association.

ExploreHealthCareers.org: “Occupational Therapist.”

American College of Rheumatology: “The Role of the Occupational Therapist in the Management of Rheumatic Disease.”

KidsHealth.org, Nemours Foundation: “Occupational Therapy.”

Ithaca College: “What Is Occupational Therapy?”

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on July 07, 2019

SOURCES:

American Occupational Therapy Association.

ExploreHealthCareers.org: “Occupational Therapist.”

American College of Rheumatology: “The Role of the Occupational Therapist in the Management of Rheumatic Disease.”

KidsHealth.org, Nemours Foundation: “Occupational Therapy.”

Ithaca College: “What Is Occupational Therapy?”

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on July 07, 2019

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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