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What makes you feel chronic pain?

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The feeling of pain comes from a series of messages that zip through your nervous system. When you hurt yourself, the injury turns on pain sensors in that area. They send a message in the form of an electrical signal, which travels from nerve to nerve until it reaches your brain. Your brain processes the signal and sends out the message that you hurt. Usually the signal stops when the cause of the pain is resolved -- your body repairs the wound on your finger or your torn muscle. But with chronic pain, the nerve signals keep firing even after you've healed.

From: Do I Have Chronic Pain? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Academy of Family Physicians: "Chronic Pain."

American Psychological Association: "Coping with chronic pain."

American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine: "Types of Chronic Pain."

Institute for Chronic Pain: "Understanding Chronic Pain."

Mayo Clinic: "Is there a link between pain and depression?"

Medscape: "Chronic Pain Syndrome Clinical Presentation."

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health: "Chronic Pain."

Nemours Foundation: "Why Do I Have Pain?"

NIH Medline Plus: "Chronic Pain: Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment."

The American Academy of Pain Medicine: "AAPM Facts and Figures on Pain."

UW Medicine: "Chronic Pain."

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on May 23, 2019

SOURCES:

American Academy of Family Physicians: "Chronic Pain."

American Psychological Association: "Coping with chronic pain."

American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine: "Types of Chronic Pain."

Institute for Chronic Pain: "Understanding Chronic Pain."

Mayo Clinic: "Is there a link between pain and depression?"

Medscape: "Chronic Pain Syndrome Clinical Presentation."

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health: "Chronic Pain."

Nemours Foundation: "Why Do I Have Pain?"

NIH Medline Plus: "Chronic Pain: Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment."

The American Academy of Pain Medicine: "AAPM Facts and Figures on Pain."

UW Medicine: "Chronic Pain."

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on May 23, 2019

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