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What medications can cause muscle cramps?

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Muscle cramps can also occur as a side effect of some drugs. Medications that can cause muscle cramps include:

  • Furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (Microzide), and other diuretics ("water pills") that remove fluid from the body
  • Donepezil (Aricept), used to treat Alzheimer's disease
  • Neostigmine (Prostigmine), used for myasthenia gravis
  • Nifedipine (Procardia), a treatment for angina and high blood pressure
  • Raloxifene (Evista), an osteoporosis treatment
  • Terbutaline (Brethine), albuterol (Proventil and Ventolin), asthma medications
  • Tolcapone (Tasmar), which helps treat Parkinson's disease
  • Statin medications for cholesterol, such as atorvastatin (Lipitor), fluvastatin (Lescol), lovastatin (Mevacor), pravastatin (Pravachol), rosuvastatin (Crestor), or simvastatin (Zocor)

SOURCES:

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgery: "Muscle Cramp."

Northwestern Health Sciences University : "Charley Horses -- Why Do I Get Them and How Can I Stop Them?"

LECOM College of Osteopathic Medicine: "Muscle cramp -- A common pain."

National Library of Medicine: "Muscle Cramps."

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on March 31, 2019

SOURCES:

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgery: "Muscle Cramp."

Northwestern Health Sciences University : "Charley Horses -- Why Do I Get Them and How Can I Stop Them?"

LECOM College of Osteopathic Medicine: "Muscle cramp -- A common pain."

National Library of Medicine: "Muscle Cramps."

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on March 31, 2019

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What leg stretches can help with muscle cramps?

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