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What will my doctor do to my tennis elbow?

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Your doctor will start with a physical exam and ask questions about your symptoms and what causes them. During the exam, she may feel different parts of your arm to check for pain. She may also move the arm, wrist or fingers in different ways

Often, that’s enough to tell if you have tennis elbow. If your doctor thinks there may be something else going on, you may get tests such as:

Electromyography. This will help your doctor see whether you have a problem with the nerves in your elbow and how well and fast they send signals. It can also measure electrical activity in your muscles when they’re at rest and when you contract them.

MRI. This can find arthritis in your neck or problems in your back, such as a disk issue, that could cause pain in your elbow.

X-ray. This can check for arthritis in your elbow.

SOURCES:

Orth Info: “Tennis Elbow (Lateral Epicondylitis).”

Harvard Health Publications, Harvard Medical School: “What to Do About Tennis Elbow.”

Mayo Clinic: “Tennis Elbow.”

Family Doctor.org: “Tennis Elbow.”

NHS: “Tennis Elbow.”

University of Rochester: “Tennis Elbow.”

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on December 24, 2018

SOURCES:

Orth Info: “Tennis Elbow (Lateral Epicondylitis).”

Harvard Health Publications, Harvard Medical School: “What to Do About Tennis Elbow.”

Mayo Clinic: “Tennis Elbow.”

Family Doctor.org: “Tennis Elbow.”

NHS: “Tennis Elbow.”

University of Rochester: “Tennis Elbow.”

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on December 24, 2018

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How can I manage pain from tennis elbow?

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