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When are injections needed for joint pain?

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For people who don't find joint pain relief from oral or topical medications, the doctor can inject a steroid medication (which may be combined with a local anesthetic) directly into the joint every three months to four months. Steroid injections are most commonly used in patients with arthritis or tendinitis. The procedure is effective, but in most situations the effect be temporary. It can also have side effects; if steroid injections mask an injury, you could overuse the joint and damage it even further. Other injection options include:

  • Removing fluid from the joint (and is often done in connection with a steroid injection)
  • Injections of hyaluronan, a synthetic version of the natural joint fluid. This is used to treat osteoarthritis

From: Joint Pain WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

CDC: "QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Reporting Joint Pain or Stiffness - National Health Interview Survey, United States, 2006."

Collyott, C.L. 2008. Orthopaedic Nursing,

Palmer T. , 2004. The Journal of the American Board of Family Practice

Vangsness, C.T. Jr. , 2009. Arthroscopy

WebMD Health News: "FDA Approves Cymbalta for Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain."

Reviewed by David Zelman on January 12, 2017

SOURCES:

CDC: "QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Reporting Joint Pain or Stiffness - National Health Interview Survey, United States, 2006."

Collyott, C.L. 2008. Orthopaedic Nursing,

Palmer T. , 2004. The Journal of the American Board of Family Practice

Vangsness, C.T. Jr. , 2009. Arthroscopy

WebMD Health News: "FDA Approves Cymbalta for Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain."

Reviewed by David Zelman on January 12, 2017

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How can physical therapy help with joint pain?

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