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When is surgery needed for rotator cuff impingement and what is the most common surgery?

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If your symptoms don’t go away after 6 months, your doctor could suggest surgery. This may also be needed if one of your tendons is torn and can’t heal on its own.

The most common surgery to fix a rotator cuff impingement is called a subacromial decompression (SAD). Your surgeon will remove any swollen tissue in your shoulder and bony growths that have occurred. This helps with healing and creates more room in your shoulder so your tendon isn’t pinched any longer.

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: “Impingement Syndrome,” “Arthroscopic Shoulder Decompression.”

Hospital for Special Surgery: “How To Avoid Injuries to Your Rotator Cuff: Impingement Syndrome.”

American Family Physician: “Management of Shoulder Impingement Syndrome and Rotator Cuff Tears.”

South Shore Hospital: “Rotator Cuff Impingement/Tendinopathy.”

Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre/NHS Trust: “Shoulder Impingement.”

Reviewed by Hansa D. Bhargava on August 21, 2020

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: “Impingement Syndrome,” “Arthroscopic Shoulder Decompression.”

Hospital for Special Surgery: “How To Avoid Injuries to Your Rotator Cuff: Impingement Syndrome.”

American Family Physician: “Management of Shoulder Impingement Syndrome and Rotator Cuff Tears.”

South Shore Hospital: “Rotator Cuff Impingement/Tendinopathy.”

Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre/NHS Trust: “Shoulder Impingement.”

Reviewed by Hansa D. Bhargava on August 21, 2020

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What is the surgery and recovery process like for rotator cuff impingement?

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