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When should I call my doctor about tennis elbow?

ANSWER

The first step in treatment is usually rest, ice, and over-the-counter pain medicine. A lot of times, that’ll do the trick. But if you still have symptoms after a week or so, or if they get worse, it’s time to call your doctor. Also, call your doctor if you have any of these signs and symptoms:

  • It's hard to move your arm.
  • There's a lump or bulge in it.
  • Pain or difficulty moving your arm keeps you from your everyday activities.
  • The area around your elbow is reddish or swollen.

SOURCES:

Orth Info: “Tennis Elbow (Lateral Epicondylitis).”

Harvard Health Publications, Harvard Medical School: “What to Do About Tennis Elbow.”

Mayo Clinic: “Tennis Elbow.”

Family Doctor.org: “Tennis Elbow.”

NHS: “Tennis Elbow.”

University of Rochester: “Tennis Elbow.”

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on December 24, 2018

SOURCES:

Orth Info: “Tennis Elbow (Lateral Epicondylitis).”

Harvard Health Publications, Harvard Medical School: “What to Do About Tennis Elbow.”

Mayo Clinic: “Tennis Elbow.”

Family Doctor.org: “Tennis Elbow.”

NHS: “Tennis Elbow.”

University of Rochester: “Tennis Elbow.”

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on December 24, 2018

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What will my doctor do to my tennis elbow?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.