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  • Question 1/6

    No pain, no gain?

  • Answer 1/6

    No pain, no gain?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Pain is your body’s warning that you should back off. If you ignore sharp pains in your joints or muscles and try to push through them, you could get hurt.

     

    But some pre- and post-workout soreness can be normal. Your joints might ache a little when you start to move but get better after a few minutes. Most people start to feel sore 12 to 24 hours after a sweat session and may still feel the burn 3 days later.

  • Question 1/6

    When you have joint pain, exercise will make it:

  • Answer 1/6

    When you have joint pain, exercise will make it:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Good luck finding a doc who prescribes bed rest for aching joints. Too little exercise makes pain worse and can make you less mobile. You’re better off on the move!

     

    How does exercise help? It boosts blood flow and gets nutrients to your joints to keep them healthy. As you get stronger, your muscles can bear more weight and take some of the pressure off of your joints. And when your workouts help you lose weight, there’s less strain on your body.

  • Question 1/6

    Which workout has been proven to help people with low back pain?

  • Answer 1/6

    Which workout has been proven to help people with low back pain?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Several studies show that low back aches get better for some people when they do yoga. One study found that those who started these workouts had less pain, better movement, and needed less medicine within just a few weeks. Talk to your doctor, then get your "om" on!

  • Question 1/6

    You have joint pain, and you’re just starting to exercise. How often should you add more to your workout?

  • Answer 1/6

    You have joint pain, and you’re just starting to exercise. How often should you add more to your workout?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    The key to safe exercise with joint pain is to start low and go slow. Start low means working out for just a few minutes at a time every other day. You could try taking a 5-minute walk at first.

     

    Then, every 3 to 4 weeks, add about 10 minutes of activity at a time. The goal is to work up to 150 minutes of exercise per week.

  • Question 1/6

    When is the best time to stretch?

  • Answer 1/6

    When is the best time to stretch?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    When you do it right after a workout, you could feel less sore later on. It’s also safer to stretch your muscles when they’re warm.

     

    But that doesn’t mean you should dive right into a workout. Always start with a warmup to boost your heart rate and blood flow to your muscles. Walk, jog, or bike for 5 to 10 minutes.

  • Question 1/6

    If you want to get stronger, you should exercise every day.

  • Answer 1/6

    If you want to get stronger, you should exercise every day.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Don’t feel guilty about taking a day off. Rest days are a crucial part of an exercise program. Your body actually gets stronger as you take time to recover. It also helps prevent injuries. Schedule one to two rest days per week.

     

    But before you cue up your Netflix queue, keep in mind “rest” doesn’t mean parking it on the couch all day. Plan some light activity, like walking. It helps improve blood flow to your muscles and aid recovery.

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    Results:

    Superstar! When it comes to working out with body aches, you know all the right moves.

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    Solid effort. Still, there’s more to learn about how to make exercise safe and effective for you.

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    Not your best work. But you deserve a pat on the back for wanting to stay active when you’re dealing with pain.

Sources | Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler, MD on June 05, 2018 Medically Reviewed on June 05, 2018

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler, MD on
June 05, 2018

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

1) Thinkstock

 

SOURCES:

American College of Sports Medicine: “Basic Injury Prevention Concepts.”

American College of Sports Medicine: “Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS).”

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: “Starting an Exercise Program.”

American Council on Exercise: “To Stretch or Not to Stretch?”

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: “Managing Arthritis Pain with Exercise.”

Sherman, K. JAMA Internal Medicine , December 2011.

American Council on Exercise: “Recovery Redefined.”

CDC: “Physical Activity for Arthritis.”

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