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  • Question 1/5

    Doctors of osteopathic medicine spend less time in medical school.

  • Answer 1/5

    Doctors of osteopathic medicine spend less time in medical school.

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    • Correct Answer:

    “MDs” are not the only kind of physician. There are also osteopathic doctors (DOs). Both kinds go to medical school for 4 years, do internships and a residency, are licensed, and pass tests before they can treat people. DOs focus on your whole body, not just a particular symptom or illness.

  • Question 1/5

    What would you not go to a DO for?

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    What would you not go to a DO for?

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    • Correct Answer:

    DOs can work in any area of medicine. They can also write prescriptions. Some also do “osteopathic manipulative treatment.” During this, your doctor will stretch your muscles and move your joints using gentle pressure and resistance. It can help people with muscle pain, asthma, migraines, and other problems. It’s much more than a massage.

  • Question 1/5

    When did osteopathic medicine begin?

  • Answer 1/5

    When did osteopathic medicine begin?

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    This medical field is more than a century old. Andrew Taylor Still, MD, who treated people during the Civil War, founded the first school of osteopathy in Missouri in 1892. It wasn’t until 1973, however, that DOs could practice in all 50 states.

  • Question 1/5

    Your insurance won’t cover care from a DO.

  • Answer 1/5

    Your insurance won’t cover care from a DO.

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    • Correct Answer:

    If your insurance would cover the same visit to an MD, it will cover treatment from a DO. Remember, osteopathic doctors can be primary care providers -- most of them are -- or they can specialize. Not sure about your case? Call your insurance company to ask what they will pay for.

  • Question 1/5

    DOs get extra training in this:

  • Answer 1/5

    DOs get extra training in this:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    DOs don’t just specialize in bones, muscles, and nerves, but they do know a lot about them.
    They get more training about your muscular and skeletal systems. This helps them understand how an injury or illness in one part of your body affects the rest of it.

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Sources | Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on August 20, 2018 Medically Reviewed on August 20, 2018

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on
August 20, 2018

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SOURCES:

Kidshealth.org: “What’s a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO)?”
Tucson Osteopathic Medical Foundation: “Facts About Osteopathic Medicine & Osteopathic Physicians.”
Scripps Health: “MD or DO: Which is the Right Doctor for You?”
Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences: “About Osteopathic Medicine.”
HealthCare.gov: “Primary Care Provider.”
Piedmont Healthcare: “Your doctor: The difference between an M.D. and D.O.”

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.