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What are resources for dementia caregivers?

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There are many resources available to caregivers of a person diagnosed with dementia. The Alzheimer's Association (800-272-3900) will refer you to your local chapter for information, resources, and their hands-on caregiver training workshops.

From: Caring for a Person With Dementia WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Ursula Braun, MD, MPH, director, inpatient palliative care unit, Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Administration Medical Center, Houston.

Karen Hirschman, PhD, professor of social work, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

Jeremy M. Hirst, MD, assistant director of psychiatry programs, Institute of Palliative Medicine at San Diego Hospice, San Diego, Calif.

Greg Sachs, MD, chief of geriatrics, Indiana School of Medicine and lead researcher, IU Center for Aging Research, Indianapolis

Robert Matsuda, Los Angeles

George Roby, Chagrin Fall, Ohio

AARP Caregiver Resource Center

Alzheimer's Association.

National Institute on Aging: "Caregiver Guide."

Family Caregiver Alliance: "Caregiver's Guide to Understanding Dementia Behaviors."

Alzheimer's Association, , Meredith Corporation, 2010. Caregivers Notebook

Broyles, F. Coach Broyles' Playbook for Alzheimer's Caregivers: A practical guide.

Glenner, J.A., , Johns Hopkins University Press,  2005. When Your Loved One Has Dementia: A simple guide for caregivers

Gruetzner, H., , 3rd edition, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2001. Alzheimer's: A caregiver's guide and sourcebook

Legacy Caregiver Services, , 2nd Edition, Legacy Health System, 2006. The Caregiver Helpbook: Powerful Tools for Caregivers

Mace, N. L. , 4th edition, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2006. The 36-Hour Day: A Family Guide to Caring for People with Alzheimer Disease, Other Dementias, and Memory Loss in Later Life

Meyer, M. M. ,  CareTrust Publications, 2007. The Comfort of Home for Alzheimer's Disease

Marcell, J. Impressive Press, 2001. Elder Rage -- or -- Take My Father .. Please!,

 

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on August 17, 2017

SOURCES:

Ursula Braun, MD, MPH, director, inpatient palliative care unit, Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Administration Medical Center, Houston.

Karen Hirschman, PhD, professor of social work, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

Jeremy M. Hirst, MD, assistant director of psychiatry programs, Institute of Palliative Medicine at San Diego Hospice, San Diego, Calif.

Greg Sachs, MD, chief of geriatrics, Indiana School of Medicine and lead researcher, IU Center for Aging Research, Indianapolis

Robert Matsuda, Los Angeles

George Roby, Chagrin Fall, Ohio

AARP Caregiver Resource Center

Alzheimer's Association.

National Institute on Aging: "Caregiver Guide."

Family Caregiver Alliance: "Caregiver's Guide to Understanding Dementia Behaviors."

Alzheimer's Association, , Meredith Corporation, 2010. Caregivers Notebook

Broyles, F. Coach Broyles' Playbook for Alzheimer's Caregivers: A practical guide.

Glenner, J.A., , Johns Hopkins University Press,  2005. When Your Loved One Has Dementia: A simple guide for caregivers

Gruetzner, H., , 3rd edition, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2001. Alzheimer's: A caregiver's guide and sourcebook

Legacy Caregiver Services, , 2nd Edition, Legacy Health System, 2006. The Caregiver Helpbook: Powerful Tools for Caregivers

Mace, N. L. , 4th edition, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2006. The 36-Hour Day: A Family Guide to Caring for People with Alzheimer Disease, Other Dementias, and Memory Loss in Later Life

Meyer, M. M. ,  CareTrust Publications, 2007. The Comfort of Home for Alzheimer's Disease

Marcell, J. Impressive Press, 2001. Elder Rage -- or -- Take My Father .. Please!,

 

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on August 17, 2017

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