PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What are things loved ones can do to help me with a life-threatening illness?

ANSWER

Many people will ask what they can do to help. If you know what that is, it's a good idea to tell them, or they will come up with their own ideas of how to help, which may or may not be what you need. You might want:

  • Someone to sit with you and hold your hand during times of day that are particularly tough for you
  • To talk a lot about your diagnosis and condition
  • To talk about anything but your diagnosis and condition
  • People to help you get out and participate in activities you enjoy
  • Friends to help you with mundane daily activities, or with caring for children or pets

SOURCES:

Leisa Rebold, MSW, social worker, Capital Caring, Washington, D.C.

Sean Morrison, MD, director, National Palliative Care Research Center, New York.

Hermann Merkin, professor of Palliative Care, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York.

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on September 11, 2017

SOURCES:

Leisa Rebold, MSW, social worker, Capital Caring, Washington, D.C.

Sean Morrison, MD, director, National Palliative Care Research Center, New York.

Hermann Merkin, professor of Palliative Care, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York.

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on September 11, 2017

NEXT QUESTION:

Should you tell a child about a life-threatening illness?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

    Other Answers On: