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Are there habits I can encourage to help my child limit his bedwetting?

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Have your child use the bathroom when he starts to get ready for bed, then again the minute before he gets into bed. This helps to empty his bladder.

If you’re still awake an hour or two after your child’s bedtime, think about waking him for a quick bathroom visit. (Or if your child is older, he might be able to set this habit for himself.) It won’t stop bedwetting, but it can reduce the amount of pee that might end up in bed.

From: 9 Tips to Handle Your Child’s Bedwetting WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Roy Benaroch on September 26, 2016

Medically Reviewed on 09/26/2016

SOURCES:

Nemours Foundation: “Bedwetting (Nocturnal enuresis).”

American Academy of Pediatrics: “Waking up dry: Helping your child overcome bedwetting.” “Bedwetting.”

National Kidney Foundation: “Questions kids ask.”    

American Academy of Family Physicians: “Enuresis (bed-wetting).”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, “Bedwetting.”

Reviewed by Roy Benaroch on September 26, 2016

SOURCES:

Nemours Foundation: “Bedwetting (Nocturnal enuresis).”

American Academy of Pediatrics: “Waking up dry: Helping your child overcome bedwetting.” “Bedwetting.”

National Kidney Foundation: “Questions kids ask.”    

American Academy of Family Physicians: “Enuresis (bed-wetting).”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, “Bedwetting.”

Reviewed by Roy Benaroch on September 26, 2016

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