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Does my baby need to drink water?

ANSWER

Babies don't need water during their first 6 months of life. They get all the water they need from breast milk or baby formula. Babies under age 6 months should not be given any water at all, because it’s easy to fill up their tiny stomachs -- and they should be filling up on the nutrients they receive from the milk to grow. Once they start eating mostly solid foods, around age 9 months, they can start water with meals using a sippy cup.

SOURCES:

American Academy of Pediatrics: "Starting Solid Foods."

Rachel Lewis, MD, assistant professor of clinical pediatrics, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York.

Steven Parker, MD, director, division of behavioral and developmental pediatrics, Boston Medical Center.

Jennifer Shu, MD; co-author, and . Heading Home with Your Newborn: From Birth to Reality Food Fights: Winning the Nutritional Challenges of Parenthood Armed with Insight, Humor, and a Bottle of Ketchup

Reviewed by Amita Shroff on October 29, 2018

SOURCES:

American Academy of Pediatrics: "Starting Solid Foods."

Rachel Lewis, MD, assistant professor of clinical pediatrics, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York.

Steven Parker, MD, director, division of behavioral and developmental pediatrics, Boston Medical Center.

Jennifer Shu, MD; co-author, and . Heading Home with Your Newborn: From Birth to Reality Food Fights: Winning the Nutritional Challenges of Parenthood Armed with Insight, Humor, and a Bottle of Ketchup

Reviewed by Amita Shroff on October 29, 2018

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How long will it take for my child to be able to feed himself?

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