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Can you prevent food allergies in your baby?

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The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that you give your baby potential allergens earlier rather than later. This may actually stop them from developing allergies to those foods. If your infant is at high risk of allergies, introduce peanuts at 4-6 months.

Breastfeeding your baby for 4-6 months is the best way to prevent a milk allergy. Yogurt and soft cheeses are fine, because the proteins in these dairy products are broken down and less likely to cause tummy trouble.

Other potential allergens such as tree nuts and fish should be introduced as you give your baby solid foods, at 6-9 months.

Wait until at least age 1 (some experts say 2) to introduce honey.

SOURCES:

American Academy of Pediatrics: "Starting Solid Foods."

Rachel Lewis, MD, assistant professor of clinical pediatrics, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York.

American Medical Association: "Allergic reaction: Food allergies increasing, especially among children."

Medline Plus Medical Encyclopedia: "Food Allergy."

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on March 23, 2019

SOURCES:

American Academy of Pediatrics: "Starting Solid Foods."

Rachel Lewis, MD, assistant professor of clinical pediatrics, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York.

American Medical Association: "Allergic reaction: Food allergies increasing, especially among children."

Medline Plus Medical Encyclopedia: "Food Allergy."

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on March 23, 2019

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