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How do I know if my plastic baby bottles have BPA in them?

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You can confidently buy new plastic baby bottles, knowing that they are free of the potentially harmful chemical BPA. If you are using older plastic bottles, for example bottles given to you by family members, check the recycling symbol on the bottom. The symbol #7 or the label PC (which stands for polycarbonate) is a sign that the bottle likely contains BPA. Bottles with the symbol #1, #2, or #4 are made of polyethylene, and #5 bottles are made of polypropylene. Both kinds of bottle can be used safely since neither type contains BPA.

From: Glass vs. Plastic Baby Bottles WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Environment California Research and Policy Center: "Toxic Baby Bottles."

WebMD Health News: "FDA Bans BPA in Baby Bottles."

Prins, G. 2008. Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology,

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences: "NTP Brief on Bisphenol A."

Newbold, R 2007. Reproductive Toxicology,

Children's Health Environmental Coalition: "Chemical Profile bisphenol-A."

Statement from Norris Alderson, PhD, Associate Commissioner for Science, Food and Drug Administration, Before the Subcommittee on Consumer Affairs, Insurance, and Automotive Safety, United States Senate, May 14, 2008.

Environmental Working Group: "EWG's Guide to Infant Formula and Baby Bottles: Guide to Baby-Safe Bottles & Formula."

FDA: "FDA Regulations No Longer Authorize the Use of BPA in Infant Formula Packaging Based on Abandonment; Decision Not Based on Safety," July 11, 2013.

 

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on July 19, 2019

SOURCES:

Environment California Research and Policy Center: "Toxic Baby Bottles."

WebMD Health News: "FDA Bans BPA in Baby Bottles."

Prins, G. 2008. Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology,

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences: "NTP Brief on Bisphenol A."

Newbold, R 2007. Reproductive Toxicology,

Children's Health Environmental Coalition: "Chemical Profile bisphenol-A."

Statement from Norris Alderson, PhD, Associate Commissioner for Science, Food and Drug Administration, Before the Subcommittee on Consumer Affairs, Insurance, and Automotive Safety, United States Senate, May 14, 2008.

Environmental Working Group: "EWG's Guide to Infant Formula and Baby Bottles: Guide to Baby-Safe Bottles & Formula."

FDA: "FDA Regulations No Longer Authorize the Use of BPA in Infant Formula Packaging Based on Abandonment; Decision Not Based on Safety," July 11, 2013.

 

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on July 19, 2019

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