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How is an umbilical hernia treated?

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This is when your baby has a bulge around his belly button. Most umbilical hernias don’t need any treatment. Usually, the hole heals on its own by the time your child is 4 or 5 years old. Even if it doesn’t, it’ll likely get smaller. That’ll make surgery a bit easier.

If the hole is large, your doctor may recommend surgery before your child turns 4 or 5. It usually takes less than an hour and your child goes home the same day.

The surgeon makes a small cut just below the belly button. If any part of the intestine pokes through, they’ll push it back where it belongs. The doctor will use stitches to close the hernia. He’ll also sew the skin under the navel to give it an “innie” look. Then, he’ll seal the cut with dissolving surgical glue that’ll hold the edges of the wound together.

From: What Are Umbilical Hernias? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia: “Umbilical Hernia.”

American Academy of Pediatrics: “Umbilical Cord Care.”

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital: “Innies vs. ‘Outies’.”

Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center: “Umbilical Hernia.”

University of California San Francisco Medical Center: “Umbilical Hernia.”

March of Dimes: “Low Birthweight.”

Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center: “Umbilical Hernia Repair Surgery.”

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on October 16, 2018

SOURCES:

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia: “Umbilical Hernia.”

American Academy of Pediatrics: “Umbilical Cord Care.”

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital: “Innies vs. ‘Outies’.”

Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center: “Umbilical Hernia.”

University of California San Francisco Medical Center: “Umbilical Hernia.”

March of Dimes: “Low Birthweight.”

Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center: “Umbilical Hernia Repair Surgery.”

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on October 16, 2018

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How is an umbilical hernia managed after surgery?

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