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What eating milestones should you expect in your 4-month-old?

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Some pediatricians don’t recommend starting babies on solid foods until six months. But depending on your baby’s size -- bigger babies may not be satisfied with breast milk or formula alone -- and readiness, your doctor may say it’s okay to start solids at four months. Before that first feeding, make sure that your baby has good head and neck control and can sit upright with support. Babies at this age may still have a strong tongue-thrust reflex. If you put a spoon of cereal in your baby’s mouth and he or she pushes it right back out, you may need to wait a week or two before trying solids again.

From: Baby Development: Your 4-Month-Old WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Feigelman S, ''The first year,'' in Kliegman RM, Behrman RE, Jenson HB, Stanton, BF, eds. 18 ed, Saunders Elsevier, 2007. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics,th

Sears, W, MD, and Sears M, Little, Brown & Company, 1993. The Baby Book,

National Library of Medicine: ''Age-appropriate diet for children.''

Curtis, GB, MD, MPH, and Schuler J, , Da Capo Press, 2005. Your Baby’s First Year Week by Week

Jennifer Shu, MD, Pediatrician at Children’s Medical Group, Atlanta, and co-author of . Heading Home with Your Newborn

Joanne Cox, MD, Director of the Primary Care Center and Associate Chief of General Pediatrics, Boston Children's Hospital.

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on October 16, 2019

SOURCES:

Feigelman S, ''The first year,'' in Kliegman RM, Behrman RE, Jenson HB, Stanton, BF, eds. 18 ed, Saunders Elsevier, 2007. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics,th

Sears, W, MD, and Sears M, Little, Brown & Company, 1993. The Baby Book,

National Library of Medicine: ''Age-appropriate diet for children.''

Curtis, GB, MD, MPH, and Schuler J, , Da Capo Press, 2005. Your Baby’s First Year Week by Week

Jennifer Shu, MD, Pediatrician at Children’s Medical Group, Atlanta, and co-author of . Heading Home with Your Newborn

Joanne Cox, MD, Director of the Primary Care Center and Associate Chief of General Pediatrics, Boston Children's Hospital.

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on October 16, 2019

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What communication milestones should you expect in your 4-month-old?

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