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What is a bedwetting alarm?

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Some kids wet the bed because their bodies don’t yet alert them to wake up when their bladders are full. Bedwetting alarms wake children at the first sign that they’re letting go of urine. The child wears special underwear with sensors that beep loudly when a small amount of urine leaks out. The beeping wakes the child, who can go to the bathroom.

Over time, the alarm trains the body to notice what it feels like when the bladder is full, and nighttime wake-ups happen on their own.

From: 9 Tips to Handle Your Child’s Bedwetting WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Roy Benaroch on September 26, 2016

Medically Reviewed on 09/26/2016

SOURCES:

Nemours Foundation: “Bedwetting (Nocturnal enuresis).”

American Academy of Pediatrics: “Waking up dry: Helping your child overcome bedwetting.” “Bedwetting.”

National Kidney Foundation: “Questions kids ask.”    

American Academy of Family Physicians: “Enuresis (bed-wetting).”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, “Bedwetting.”

Reviewed by Roy Benaroch on September 26, 2016

SOURCES:

Nemours Foundation: “Bedwetting (Nocturnal enuresis).”

American Academy of Pediatrics: “Waking up dry: Helping your child overcome bedwetting.” “Bedwetting.”

National Kidney Foundation: “Questions kids ask.”    

American Academy of Family Physicians: “Enuresis (bed-wetting).”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, “Bedwetting.”

Reviewed by Roy Benaroch on September 26, 2016

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